BISim: Soldiers Cross the Threshold of Artificial Intelligence in Battlefield Decisions

A new requirement is developing for artificial intelligence to provide course of action solutions in support of military operations, according to Pete Morrison, chief commercial officer at Bohemia Interactive Simulations (BISim), a wholly-owned subsidiary of BAE Systems.

“The Army wants to move it into the light combat space,” Morrison said. “As far as I know, we’re just starting to get into that phase. Right now.”

During BISim’s 25 years of operation, it has provided virtual battlefield simulation (VBS) training platforms for the US and UK armed forces. In December 2023 the German Bundeswehr also obtained a business license for the VBS4. Artificial Intelligence has enabled VBS to help train personnel in military training institutions, with wargaming helping to train administrative staff and future leaders.

However, Morrison sees that, for the first time, computers are providing commanders with solutions for decision-making outside of war. “There’s definitely a demand for it to be available to support businesses,” Morrison said, “which is a very different set of outcomes.”

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“There’s definitely a requirement for it to be available to support businesses, which is a very different set of outcomes.”

Pete Morrison, Chief Commercial Officer of Bohemia Interactive Simulations.

Army Technology interviewed Morrison to talk about the role artificial intelligence should play in military planning and how simulation in wargaming drives home the lessons for ground forces.

BISim was purchased by BAE Systems in March 2022 for $200 million, acquiring the global software and advanced military simulation company for BAE’s growing digital transformation portfolio.

“We’re entering this really exciting era where we have new sensor systems that provide us with data, we have new artificial intelligence, and we have hard problems to solve,” Morrison said.

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Simulation has been a long-standing aspect of training for Navy and Air Force personnel, but was met with some skepticism when it was first introduced for Army troops more than 20 years ago.

In a study published in 2008 process from Interservice/Industrial Training, Simulation and Education Conference“Games – How Serious Are They?”, researchers Paul Roman and Doug Brown found that training with simulated war games led to a dramatic increase in student success rates at the Canadian Combat Training Centre.

After the paper was released, attitudes toward simulation in ground force training warmed, and the scale and detail of simulated training expanded, according to Morrison.

While BISim specializes in hyper-realistic rendering of battlefield features to produce immersive simulations, the artificial intelligence provided comes from working with companies such as Tillman, who provide a Linguistic Geometry technology called LG RAID.

“It has to be deterministic. It has to do the same thing every time, if no variables have changed, because otherwise it starts to undermine your training.”

Pete Morrison, Chief Commercial Officer of Bohemia Interactive Simulations.

Different from modern developments in large language models that use machine learning algorithms, Linguistic Geometry uses a decision tree approach to develop action suggestions that are reproducible and not subject to randomness or variation in the way artificial intelligence technologies are.

“The reason we don’t use machine learning to train this AI is because it really needs to be incredibly predictable,” Morrison said. “It has to be deterministic. It has to do the same thing every time, if no variables have changed, because otherwise it starts to undermine your training.”

Morrison also points out that to train an AI through machine learning would use a vast amount of data, and as far as he knows, no such resource exists. He adds that if a military is ever going to be able to train a tactical machine-leaning AI in a reasonable way, it needs to build that resource.

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Asked about the ethics of adopting artificial intelligence for autonomous systems on the battlefield, Morrison points out that the technology for a kill chain that must be completed autonomously already exists, and that adversaries with this technology may have fewer ethical problems related to the implementation of such tools.

“BISim provides the virtual environment, this battleground real estate, where this type of AI model, running on an unmanned aerial system, can be tested, proven, before you start doing these things in the real world.”

Pete Morrison, Chief Commercial Officer of Bohemia Interactive Simulations.

“For example, we need a human operator for every single drone we develop, because that human operator has to decide whether to pull the trigger. We might have an opponent where one human can control 1000 drones because the drones make that decision. These are the kinds of problems we need to address incredibly quickly. Especially around drones because the aircraft itself is a weapon.”

“BISim provides the virtual environment, this battleground real estate, where this type of AI model, running on an unmanned aerial system, can be tested, proven, before you start doing these things in the real world.”

The push for an environment to test artificial intelligence, as well as the fear of negative training for human operators, prompted BISim to develop hyper-realistic environments that render 3D rendering of the terrain, combined with advanced modeling of parameters such as meteorological conditions, and a thorough and accurate simulation of equipment strengths and weaknesses.

“We are now focused on making sure we can take extremely high-resolution ground data and make an absolutely photorealistic representation of the real world, so that every tree is exactly where it is in the real world. It opens up the possibilities, not only for training, but also for mission planning,” concluded Morrison.



Read the original at Defence247.gr

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